Latest

  • Trump Directing Government To Revamp Care For Kidney Disease

    Posted by:

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday revamping care for kidney disease so more people whose kidneys fail can have a chance at early transplants and home dialysis, and others don’t get that sick in the first place.

    Trump said his order was aimed at “making life better and longer for millions” by increasing the supply of donated kidneys, making it easier for patients to have dialysis in the comfort of their own homes and prioritizing the development of an artificial kidney.

    The changes won’t happen overnight because some initiatives will require new government regulations.

    Because a severe organ shortage complicates the call for more transplants, the Trump administration will try to ease the financial hardships for living donors by reimbursing them for expenses such as lost wages and child care.

    “Those people, I have to say, have never gotten enough credit,” Trump said. “What they do is so incredible.”

    Another key change: steps to help the groups that collect deceased donations do a better job. Trump said it may be possible to find 17,000 more kidneys and 11,000 other organs from deceased donors for transplant every year.

    For families like those of 1-year-old Hudson Nash, the lack of organs is frightening. Hudson was born with damaged kidneys, and his parents hope he will be big enough for a transplant in another year. Until then, “to keep him going, he takes numerous medicines, receives multiple shots, blood draws and more doctors’ visits than I can count,” said his mother, Jamie Nash of Santa Barbara, California.

    Today’s system favors expensive, time-consuming dialysis in large centers — what Trump called so onerous “it’s like a full-time job” — over easier-to-tolerate at-home care or transplants that help patients live longer.

    More than 30 million American adults have chronic kidney disease, costing Medicare a staggering $113 billion.

    Careful treatment — including control of diabetes and high blood pressure, the two main culprits — can help prevent further kidney deterioration. But more than 700,000 people have end-stage renal disease, meaning their kidneys have failed, and require either a transplant or dialysis to survive. Only about one-third received specialized kidney care before they got so sick.

    “My health care providers failed me at the beginning of the dialysis continuum,” said transplant recipient Tunisia Bullock of Rocky Mount, North Carolina. Her kidney failure struck while she was being treated for another disease, and she woke up in the hospital attached to a dialysis machine. She told Trump that she hoped the new initiatives help other patients find care “with less confusion and more ease.”

    More than 94,000 of the 113,000 people on the national organ waiting list need a kidney. Last year, there were 21,167 kidney transplants. Of those, 6,442 were from living donors, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing, which oversees the nation’s transplant system.

    “The longer you’re on dialysis, the outcomes are worse,” said Dr. Amit Tevar, a transplant surgeon at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, who praised the administration’s initiatives.

    Too often, transplant centers don’t see a kidney patient until he or she has been on dialysis for years, Tevar said. While any transplant is preferable, one from a living donor is best because those organs “work better, longer and faster,” Tevar said.

    Among the initiatives that take effect first:

    —Medicare payment changes that would provide a financial incentive for doctors and clinics to help kidney patients stave off end-stage disease. The goal is to lower the number of new kidney failure cases by 25% by 2030.

    —a bonus to kidney specialists who help prepare patients for early transplant, with steps that can begin even before they need dialysis.

    —additional Medicare changes so that dialysis providers can earn as much by helping patients get dialysis at home as in the large centers that predominate today. Patients typically must spend hours three or four times a week hooked to machines that filter waste out of their blood.

    Home options include portable blood-cleansing machines, or what’s called peritoneal dialysis that works through an abdominal tube, usually while patients are sleeping.

    Today, about 11% of patients in kidney failure get at-home dialysis and an additional 3 percent get an early transplant. By 2025, the goal is to have 80% of people with newly diagnosed kidney failure getting one of those options, officials said.

    These changes are being put in place through Medicare’s innovation center, created under the Obama-era Affordable Care Act and empowered to seek savings and improved quality. The administration is relying on the innovation center even as it argues in federal court that the law that created it is unconstitutional and should be struck down entirely.

    Other initiatives will require new regulations, expected to be proposed later this year. Among them:

    —allowing reimbursement of lost wages and other expenses for living donors, who can give one of their kidneys or a piece of their liver. The transplant recipient’s insurance pays the donor’s medical bills. But donors are out of work for weeks recuperating, and one study found more than one-third of living kidney donors reported lost wages, a median of $2,712, in the year following donation. Details about who pays and who qualifies still have to be worked out.

    —clearer ways to measure how well the nation’s 58 organ procurement organizations, or OPOs, collect donations from deceased donors. Some do a better job than others, but today’s performance standards are self-reported, varying around the country and making it difficult for government regulators or the OPOs themselves to take steps to improve.

    “Some OPOs are very aggressive and move forward with getting organs allocated and donors consented, and there are those that are a little more lackadaisical about it,” said Pittsburgh’s Tevar. Unlike the medical advances in transplantation, “we haven’t really made big dents and progress and moves in increasing cadaveric organs or increasing live donor options.”

    ___

    Associated Press writer Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar contributed to this report.

     

    Neil A. Carousso Interviewed Kim Commins-Tzoumakas, CEO of 21st Century Oncology and their Chief Policy Officer Dr. Connie Mantz for WCBS Newsradio 880.

    Read More

  • 1969 Miracle Mets Get Key To City, World Series Parade At 50th Anniversary Celebration

    Posted by:

    NEW YORK (WCBS 880) — The Mets are turning back the clock this weekend as they celebrate the 50th anniversary of 1969 World Series championship team.

    Members of the “Miracle Mets” cruised along the newly named Seaver Way in vintage Ford convertibles as the team reenacted the 1969 World Series parade.

    PHOTO GALLERY: 1969 Miracle Mets Celebration At Citi Field

    Jerry Koosman, Bud Harrelson, Jerry Grote, Cleon Jones, Art Shamsky, Ed Kranepool and other members of the championship team were then given keys to the city from Mayor Bill de Blasio, who called them a “lovable group of guys” and “ultimate underdogs.

    “New York City felt a lot in 1969 and New York City has never stopped loving you guys,” the mayor said.

    “This is all good. We’ve had a pretty wild weekend,” Miracle Mets outfielder Ron Swoboda said. “To be with these guys that we don’t see much of is perfect. It’s pretty cool to come back here. This is an upbeat thing for me, we’re not going to be here for 100.”

    1969 Miracle Mets: Top World Series Moments | QUIZ: Test Your ’69 Mets Knowledge

    “It’s one of the most iconic teams in the history of baseball and I think we all appreciate how special that was,” Shamsky said. “It’s just a great day and a great time for all of us.”

    “The last time we got together it was 10 years ago, I wish we could do it at least every five years that would be really nice,” said 1969 Mets third baseman Wayne Garrett. But while many years have passed he says they just pick up where they left off the last time.

    “It’s tremendous, we haven’t been together in 10 years when we had the 40th anniversary, it’s always good to see them,” said Kranepool, who attended the celebration after recovering from his recent kidney transplant.

    The team reunited on the field where they were honored with a special ceremony, emceed by Mets radio broadcaster Howie Rose.

    The Mets also paid tribute to the 1969 members who are no longer with us, and those who could not attend due to health issues.

    Most notably absent was “The Franchise” Tom Seaver, who is suffering from dementia and has retired from public life.

    “He was the team. Everything focused around Tom, he was ‘The Franchise’ and we all knew that and when Tom was pitching good, we played good for some reason. When he threw and when he was on, and it seemed to be just about everytime he took the mound, he gave that inspiration to all of us and the confidence. He instilled that in all of us, and it’s too bad he’s not here,” Garrett said.

    “I’m disappointed that Seaver’s not in good health, that’s one of the biggest reasons I’m here,” former third baseman Bobby Pfeil said. “In essence, I’m here to honor him.”

    Earlier this week, the Mets honored the star of the 1969 World Series championship team, Tom Seaver, by changing the Citi Field address to 41 Seaver Way. The team also announced they have commissioned an eight-foot statue of Seaver to be built in front of the ballpark in the near future.

    Nicknamed “Tom Teriffic,” Seaver, widely considered the best Mets player in history, won three Cy Young awards while with the team and was voted into the Hall of Fame on his first ballot.

    On Sunday, the 1969 celebration continues with Shamsky signing copies of his book After the Miracle: The Lasting Brotherhood of the ’69 Mets in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda prior to the start of the game and the first 15,000 fans who enter the ballpark gates will receive a 1969 Replica Ring.

     

    Neil A. Carousso produced all videos and social content for WCBS Newsradio 880, the Flagship Station of the New York Mets.

    Read More

  • What You Missed From The WCBS Small Business Breakfast

    Posted by:

     

    NEW YORK (WCBS 880) — The WCBS Small Business Breakfast was in full swing this morning, with inspiration stemming between an insightful panel of speakers and up-and-coming entrepreneurs. Special guests Fashion Icon Cynthia Rowley, Eric Kinariwala, founder of Capsule, and Peter Madonia, who runs the family-owned Madonia Bakery were moderated by WCBS’s Joe Connolly.

    Small business owners listened and learned from these three heavy hitters before engaging in an informative Q&A.

    When asked how she stays relevant in the fashion industry, Rowley says that she’s still having fun, and she’s driven by the creative process and loves to work on her brand. Throughout her career she has had no investors or partners, and only used $3,000 that she received from her grandmother! Rowley’s advice is that she never gets too high or low with success and failures. She is always learning and making adjustments.

    “You have to build something that people something that people want,” said Kinariwala, founder of the med-tech pharmaceutical company Capsule. The inspiration for Capsule stemmed from a sick-day where Kinariwala stood on line for far too long only to find out that his medication wasn’t available. Kinariwala is bringing the pharmaceutical industry to the palm of your hand to help make the industry that much more private and personal. When asked about the forefront of building his business, he notes there must be demand and that it doesn’t matter how good your advertising is or how large of a distribution.

    Chief of Staff to former NYC Mayor Bloomberg and ex-COO of the Rockefeller Foundation, Peter Madonia left a job in political management to run his family’s 100-year-old bakery on Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. At the Small Business Breakfast he discusses his business principles and how he pays his bills in seven days.

    The event was held at the Manhattan Pavilion, and you can join us for breakfast and coffee on Long Island in the Fall. Stay tuned for more information. We’ll see you there!

     

    Neil A. Carousso produces the WCBS Small Business Breakfast and Small Business Spotlight programs.

    Read More

  • Exclusive: Anthony Scaramucci: My Wife ‘Would Have A Lot of Fun’ Starring on ‘Real Housewives’

    Posted by:

    By Suzanne Rozdeba, Radio.com

    Anthony Scaramucci is all about his wife possibly starring on “The Real Housewives of New York City.”

    “I’m totally fine with it. Whatever you want to do. I think you’d have a lot of fun,” the former White House Director of Communications told his wife Deidre during the latest episode of their RADIO.COM podcast, “Mooch and the Mrs.” 

    “I just hope that my Trump affiliation, to be totally candid — because I know a lot of people in Hollywood dislike the Orange Man — I hope the Cheetos stains on my hands are not on your hands,” he quipped.

    Addressing news that broke earlier on Page Six that she was reportedly in talks to join the cast, Deidre, who co-hosts the show with Anthony, said, “I can’t really get into too much detail, but I would love to do the show, if they really wanted me to do the show. We’ll let you guys know. Stay tuned...I love reality TV…I think it would be fun!”

    Deidre said, “Somebody told me I’m not interesting. The only reason they want me is that I’m married to you. There’s probably 80 percent truth to that. The person told me, there’s so many attractive, smart, funny women in New York.”

    Anthony said, “But you have something different. You have a translucency to your personality. You’re totally comfortable and you don’t try to hide sh*t. I think that’s really impressive. It’s a perverse sign of wacko major security,” he said.

    Deidre also told RADIO.COM separately about some of the racier comments about her possibly joining the show, saying that one online commenter wrote, “No one watches Bravo TV to be reminded of Trump rubbish outcast looking like Kim Zolciak circa 2009. No Andy [Cohen], don’t do it.”

    Speaking of Zolciak, who was formerly on “The Real Housewives of Atlanta,” she said, “Everyone always says, especially when I go to the airport, and I go through TSA, they always tell me that I look like Kim Zolciak.”

    Anthony said, “That’s a compliment to Kim Zolciak. Shout-out to Kim. If you look like my wife, you’re definitely hot stuff.”

     

    Neil A. Carousso produces “Mooch and the Mrs. with Anthony and Deidre Scaramucci” on RADIO.COM. 

    Read More

  • Maria Menounos Opens Up on Brain Surgery: Sylvester Stallone Helped Me Get Through It

    Posted by:

    By Jacquie Cadorette, Radio.com

    Maria Menounos has been through quite a roller coaster of trauma, between being diagnosed with brain cancer and undergoing surgery, and coping with her mother’s own brain cancer diagnosis and treatments. In an exclusive interview with “Mooch and the Mrs., Menounos opens up about how her friend, Sylvester Stallone, helped her to cope.

    “Going into surgery, I was playing ‘Rocky’ music as my theme song,” the former “E! News” host told Anthony Scaramucci and his wife, Deidre, for their RADIO.COM podcast. “Rocky’s quote gets me through so much: ‘It ain’t about how hard you hit, it’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward,'” Menounous revealed she would say to herself through her struggles.

    “He’s a dear friend, and then when I came out of surgery, I was quoting ‘Rocky,’” Menounos said of her 2017 procedure.

    Menounos said that a quote Scaramucci once told her about fear — “Everything you want is on the other side of fear” — also stuck with her through her 2017 procedure.

    On top of coping with her own diagnoses, had her mother’s illness to think about, too. After various treatment methods left her mom weakened and ill, Menounos got her involved in alternative therapies. The therapies had their side effects, though, and when Menounos went under the knife to get her own brain tumor taken care of, her mother admitted some time later that she really didn’t remember it much.

    “Between the cognitive deficits, the radiation, inflammation, she doesn’t remember anything,” she said. However, that’s really not such a bad thing. “To me, that was another silver lining because she didn’t have to feel that. To someone who has cancer, the last thing they need is stress,” she said.

    Despite the gravity of her struggles, Menounos has been able to gain a new sense of hope and understanding. “My life had to change, and it has, drastically. Anybody else would be kind of freaking out … and I’m really loving the moments of uncomfortableness,” she said. “I feel like if I’m gonna go to the next dimension, this is kind of that place where I’m really working on [the] next level.”

    To listen to “Mooch and the Mrs.,” download the RADIO.COM app now.

    Neil A. Carousso produces and manages “Mooch and the Mrs.” for RADIO.COM, including all video and audio production.

    Read More

 
  
Neil A. Carousso is the producer in charge of content for the "Mooch and the Mrs. with Anthony and Deidre Scaramucci" podcast, exclusively via the Radio.com platform.
Sign Up for Free Email Updates
Get the latest content first.
We respect your privacy.