Interview

  • Miracle Mets To Mark 50 Years Since World Series Win With Long Island Celebration

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    NEW YORK (WCBS 880) – This week marks 50 years since the Miracle Mets shocked the baseball world. Mets Ron Swoboda and Ed Kranepool spoke with WCBS 880 about what it’s like to look back on the win after all these years.

    Outfielder Ron Swoboda told WCBS 880’s Neil A. Carousso that he and his teammates still feel a strong bond with fans and will reunite on Long Island Wednesday night to share their fond memories of the team.

    “You know baseball is our careers and all of them are made up of these little vignettes and these little stories that we can relate,” Swoboda said.

    Swoboda made “the catch” in Game 4 that helped propel the Mets past the Orioles in the World Series of 1969. He said manager Gil Hodges was a Marine who instituted much-needed leadership for the young team.

    Some baseball fans have criticized teams for relying too much on analytics, but Swoboda says Hodges applied data available to him at the time to put the best on the field.

    “You can go through game after game, play by play, and see the decisions that Hodges made and the situations he made them in,” Swoboda said. “He was uncanny in his ability to plug the right guy in at the right time, because the season had a lot of ebb and flow.”

    Ed Kranepool has played more games in a Mets uniform than anyone else. He told WCBS 880 that 1969 was a turbulent year in America and that the team’s victory was a moment of joy.

    “It was a tough time in the country back in ’69. You had people walking on the moon. You had Woodstock. You had the Vietnam War. There was a lot of negative surroundings, but of course winning in ’69 with our ball club really brought the country together and people got behind us and celebrated,” Kranepool said. “And they’ve celebrated this year, and you know it just brings joy.”

    Kranepool said a lot of players came through Shea Stadium and Citi Field, but members of the ’69 team have managed to remain friends after 50 years.

    “That group that we had in ’69 stayed very close on and off the field. We traveled as a group, we played as a group and we celebrated as a group, and we’re still celebrating, and that’s what’s great,” he said.

    Kranepool is amazed by how many fans still feel so connected to the Miracle Mets.

    “Every day when you get up in the morning you can say a little prayer and be thankful that you’re still here, you’re still able to do things. The fans will never let us forget ’69. They want to hear the stories, they want to see us, they want to get an autograph,” Kranepool said. “It brings joy to everybody’s heart to really be able to celebrate, and I’m looking forward to seeing all the fans.”

    You can join Swoboda, Kranepool and Art Shamsky at the Cradle of Aviation Museum in Garden City at 7 p.m. Wednesday—50 years to the day that the team won their first championship. You can purchase tickets for the event at cradleofaviation.org.

    Kranepool will also be at the BNB Bank Business Breakfast on Thursday at the Huntington Hilton. You can find more info on the event here.

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  • Yankees GM Brian Cashman Opens Up On Being Held at Gunpoint: ‘What Am I, Pablo Escobar?’

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    By Jacquie Cadorette

    Yankees General Manager Brian Cashman sat down with Anthony Scaramucci and his wife, Deidre Scaramucci, to open up about his experience with being nearly arrested for driving a “stolen” car. Turns out, the situation was more embarrassing than anything else.

    The Scaramuccis recorded their RADIO.COM Original podcast, “Mooch and the Mrs.,” live from New York City’s Hunt & Fish Club in Times Square on Tuesday. When Cashman took the stage, Deidre couldn’t resist asking him about the details of his near-arrest.

    Cashman begins by explaining what happened. Back in August, he went outside in the morning to take a cruise in his convertible Jeep, only to find that the car had been stolen. The car was soon recovered without damages.

    Upon retrieving the car and driving back to his home, Cashman quickly learned that the vehicle had not yet been taken off of the “stolen” list. He was pulled over, held at gunpoint, and asked to raise his hands above his head.

    As terrifying as the situation sounds, Cashman remembers one overwhelming emotion: embarrassment. “I wasn’t scared, I was embarrassed,” he explains. Patrons of a nearby Starbucks saw the whole thing.

    The Yankees GM could only imagine what they must have been thinking. He continues, “They’re thinking, ‘What am I, Pablo Escobar?’”

    Still, Cashman lauds the NYPD for their fast acting, despite having mistaken Cashman for a thief. “I give a huge applause to them,” he says of the incident.

    Cashman’s got one confession regarding the whole ordeal. “I just didn’t want the body cam footage coming out,” he explains.

    You can hear more about Scaramucci and his guests by downloading the RADIO.COM app here.

    Neil A. Carousso executive produced the “Mooch and the Mrs.” live event at Hunt & Fish Club in Times Square on Tuesday, September 17, 2019, including leading event planning, guest booking, activation, sales, and technical, digital and engineering support. 

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  • ‘RHONJ’ Alum Jacqueline Laurita Says New Podcast ‘Lets Her Let Loose’

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    By Tarrah Gibbons, RADIO.COM

    Several guests appeared on the live taping of RADIO.COM original podcast, “Mooch and the Mrs.” on Tuesday night including “Real Housewives of New Jersey” alum Jacqueline Laurita.

    During their conversation, Laurita talked about her RADIO.COM original podcast “The LookOver Ladies.”

    The podcast features just about any topics that are on a woman’s mind.

    Jacqueline Laurita, the host and former housewife of seven seasons, joins her girlfriends Jill Ashley and Melissa Polo as they talk about their hectic and exciting lives. “It’s our platform to let loose and talk about things that women love to talk about,” she said.

    “We all have backgrounds in beauty, health, wellness, fashion,” Laurita said. “We touch on all that but then we always go off on tangents and just start talking [about] random, inappropriate things,” she continued.

    But the “Real Housewives” star has never been shy when it comes to her personal life. She recently shared that her son, Nicholas, has autism.

    “My life is very autism focused. I have a son with autism. I help families that are affected by autism all the time.,” Laurita said.

    She uses her real-life experiences to help other families who have children with autism. Laurita said she coaches them to live healthy lives every day.

    In terms of her podcast, she sees it as an opportunity to escape the craziness of day-to-day life. “This is my kind of release to let go of all that and just be a girl,” she said.

    “The LookOver Ladies” can be found on the RADIO.COM app and everywhere podcasts are available.

    Neil A. Carousso executive produced the “Mooch and the Mrs.” live event at Hunt & Fish Club in Times Square on Tuesday, September 17, 2019, including leading event planning, guest booking, activation, sales, and technical, digital and engineering support. 

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  • ‘RHONJ’ Alum Kathy Wakile Talks New Foodie and Travel Podcast

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    By Tarrah Gibbons, RADIO.COM

    Real Housewives of New Jersey” alum Kathy Wakile opened up about her new RADIO.COM original podcast, “Eat Live Love Indulge with Kathy Wakile.”

    During Tuesday night’s live recording of RADIO.COM original podcast “Mooch and the Mrs.” with Anthony Scaramucci and his wife Deidre, guest Wakile opened up about her own future endeavors.

    As Wakile sat down with the Scaramuccis she described her podcast as being a “conversation we have around the table.”

    “Food is the common denominator in all of our lives. It brings us all together,” Wakile said.

    The first intro to her podcast kicked off on August 28 and September 17 was the second episode where she and her husband traveled to Portugal and Spain.

    “It’s really about the conversations while we are traveling,” she said. “It could be your family discussions, you know, around the table, and what comes up,” Wakile continued.

    “I learned a long time ago when you learn how to cook, and you’re good at it, you always have friends,” Wakile said.

    Wakile also opened up on her daughter’s health. Her daughter had to undergo two brain surgeries to remove a benign tumor.

    “We were shocked,” Wakile said. “Totally shocked, and 10 years later, fast forward -she’s in nursing school. She decided to go in that career path because she wanted to give back,” she continued.

    Wakile said her daughter is feeling great and has two semesters left in nursing school.

    Wakile joined ‘The Real Housewives of New Jersey’ during the show’s third season in 2011, and later wrote a national bestselling cookbook called, “Indulge: Delicious Little Desserts That Keep Life Real Sweet.” She also launched a line of desserts, called, Indulge with Kathy Wakile, created the Indulge cannoli kit, and opened Pizza Love, an Italian restaurant in New Jersey.

    “Eat Live Love Indulge with Kathy Wakile” can be found on the RADIO.COM app and everywhere podcasts are available.

    Neil A. Carousso executive produced the “Mooch and the Mrs.” live event at Hunt & Fish Club in Times Square on Tuesday, September 17, 2019, including leading event planning, guest booking, activation, sales, and technical, digital and engineering support. 

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  • Trump Directing Government To Revamp Care For Kidney Disease

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    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday revamping care for kidney disease so more people whose kidneys fail can have a chance at early transplants and home dialysis, and others don’t get that sick in the first place.

    Trump said his order was aimed at “making life better and longer for millions” by increasing the supply of donated kidneys, making it easier for patients to have dialysis in the comfort of their own homes and prioritizing the development of an artificial kidney.

    The changes won’t happen overnight because some initiatives will require new government regulations.

    Because a severe organ shortage complicates the call for more transplants, the Trump administration will try to ease the financial hardships for living donors by reimbursing them for expenses such as lost wages and child care.

    “Those people, I have to say, have never gotten enough credit,” Trump said. “What they do is so incredible.”

    Another key change: steps to help the groups that collect deceased donations do a better job. Trump said it may be possible to find 17,000 more kidneys and 11,000 other organs from deceased donors for transplant every year.

    For families like those of 1-year-old Hudson Nash, the lack of organs is frightening. Hudson was born with damaged kidneys, and his parents hope he will be big enough for a transplant in another year. Until then, “to keep him going, he takes numerous medicines, receives multiple shots, blood draws and more doctors’ visits than I can count,” said his mother, Jamie Nash of Santa Barbara, California.

    Today’s system favors expensive, time-consuming dialysis in large centers — what Trump called so onerous “it’s like a full-time job” — over easier-to-tolerate at-home care or transplants that help patients live longer.

    More than 30 million American adults have chronic kidney disease, costing Medicare a staggering $113 billion.

    Careful treatment — including control of diabetes and high blood pressure, the two main culprits — can help prevent further kidney deterioration. But more than 700,000 people have end-stage renal disease, meaning their kidneys have failed, and require either a transplant or dialysis to survive. Only about one-third received specialized kidney care before they got so sick.

    “My health care providers failed me at the beginning of the dialysis continuum,” said transplant recipient Tunisia Bullock of Rocky Mount, North Carolina. Her kidney failure struck while she was being treated for another disease, and she woke up in the hospital attached to a dialysis machine. She told Trump that she hoped the new initiatives help other patients find care “with less confusion and more ease.”

    More than 94,000 of the 113,000 people on the national organ waiting list need a kidney. Last year, there were 21,167 kidney transplants. Of those, 6,442 were from living donors, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing, which oversees the nation’s transplant system.

    “The longer you’re on dialysis, the outcomes are worse,” said Dr. Amit Tevar, a transplant surgeon at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, who praised the administration’s initiatives.

    Too often, transplant centers don’t see a kidney patient until he or she has been on dialysis for years, Tevar said. While any transplant is preferable, one from a living donor is best because those organs “work better, longer and faster,” Tevar said.

    Among the initiatives that take effect first:

    —Medicare payment changes that would provide a financial incentive for doctors and clinics to help kidney patients stave off end-stage disease. The goal is to lower the number of new kidney failure cases by 25% by 2030.

    —a bonus to kidney specialists who help prepare patients for early transplant, with steps that can begin even before they need dialysis.

    —additional Medicare changes so that dialysis providers can earn as much by helping patients get dialysis at home as in the large centers that predominate today. Patients typically must spend hours three or four times a week hooked to machines that filter waste out of their blood.

    Home options include portable blood-cleansing machines, or what’s called peritoneal dialysis that works through an abdominal tube, usually while patients are sleeping.

    Today, about 11% of patients in kidney failure get at-home dialysis and an additional 3 percent get an early transplant. By 2025, the goal is to have 80% of people with newly diagnosed kidney failure getting one of those options, officials said.

    These changes are being put in place through Medicare’s innovation center, created under the Obama-era Affordable Care Act and empowered to seek savings and improved quality. The administration is relying on the innovation center even as it argues in federal court that the law that created it is unconstitutional and should be struck down entirely.

    Other initiatives will require new regulations, expected to be proposed later this year. Among them:

    —allowing reimbursement of lost wages and other expenses for living donors, who can give one of their kidneys or a piece of their liver. The transplant recipient’s insurance pays the donor’s medical bills. But donors are out of work for weeks recuperating, and one study found more than one-third of living kidney donors reported lost wages, a median of $2,712, in the year following donation. Details about who pays and who qualifies still have to be worked out.

    —clearer ways to measure how well the nation’s 58 organ procurement organizations, or OPOs, collect donations from deceased donors. Some do a better job than others, but today’s performance standards are self-reported, varying around the country and making it difficult for government regulators or the OPOs themselves to take steps to improve.

    “Some OPOs are very aggressive and move forward with getting organs allocated and donors consented, and there are those that are a little more lackadaisical about it,” said Pittsburgh’s Tevar. Unlike the medical advances in transplantation, “we haven’t really made big dents and progress and moves in increasing cadaveric organs or increasing live donor options.”

    ___

    Associated Press writer Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar contributed to this report.

     

    Neil A. Carousso Interviewed Kim Commins-Tzoumakas, CEO of 21st Century Oncology and their Chief Policy Officer Dr. Connie Mantz for WCBS Newsradio 880.

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Neil A. Carousso is the producer in charge of content for the "Mooch and the Mrs. with Anthony and Deidre Scaramucci" podcast, exclusively via the Radio.com platform.
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